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An incredible sextet in Fairbanks, Alaska

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Identifier: 2003.033.001.005.001 ...
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Without Reconciliation
 
Thirty-six years after the first ascent, four Denali pioneers (along with two other notable mountaineers shown here) gathered in Fairbanks, Alaska, 150 miles from the mountain. Until mid-century, most Denali climbs were staged from this town north of the mountain because the northern Muldrow Glacier was the only accessible route.
 
Along with these luminaries, Karstens served as Mount McKinley (later renamed Denali) National Park’s first superintendent. His former partner, Stuck died of pneumonia seven years after the climb. In newspaper stories following the climb—as per Stuck’s correspondence to Karstens—reporters got the facts wrong and lionized the Archdeacon with no mention of teammates other than as anonymous “companions.” According to the park service historian, “resentments that Karstens had built up during the expedition—based partly on Stuck's sparse participation in camp duties, particularly his leaving the cooking to others, and partly on his literary airs and refined manner—now exploded.” 


"In one letter he called him an 'absolute paresite [sic, underscoring not added] & liar'"


Although Stuck kept his word and shared half the profits from magazine and book sales, Karstens never forgave the man he referred to as “the preacher.” In one letter he called him an “absolute paresite [sic, underscoring not added] & liar,” despite Stuck’s attempts at reconciliation. Stuck’s hopelessly arrogant attempts at civility included a letter in which he congratulated Karstens for his marriage, suggesting that it was his influence (the Archdeacon’s writings and lectures) that would make Karstens desirable for a woman. Still, their climb—forged upon Browne’s and the Sourdoughs’ experiences—offered a model for all climbers who followed.

"More than anyone alive, Bradford Washburn (shown here) expanded upon the lessons of his predecessors and opened up the mountain in a way that would have astounded the early pioneers. "


 And more than anyone alive, Bradford Washburn (shown here) expanded upon the lessons of his predecessors and opened up the mountain in a way that would have astounded the early pioneers. Terris Moore (also shown here) joined Washburn on the third Muldrow ascent in 1942, and then would assist Washburn in opening up Denali to all those climbers who didn’t have the time or Sourdough savoir-faire to dogsled into the mountain.
 
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Description 1949 photograph of six men, including (top row) Francis Farquhar of the Sierra Club, Harry Karstens of the 1913 Expedition, Charles McGonagall of the Sourdough Expedition, mountaineer Noel Odell, and (bottom row) Terris Moore of the University of Alaska and photographer Bradford Washburn.
Date 1949
Rights and Intellectual Property Under copyright protection.
Credit text Decaneas Archive
Conditions Governing Reproduction Usage rights for this image may be managed by the Tony Decaneas archive.
Library of Congress Subject Headings Karstens, Harry, 1878-1955 [info:lc/authorities/names/n2012056821],Washburn, Bradford, 1910-2007 [info:lc/authorities/names/n50082011]